Saturday, November 25, 2017
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(NaturalNews) They are added to everything from shampoos and deodorants to processed foods and pharmaceutical drugs in order to inexpensively extend shelf life and improve product stability. But a new study out of the University of Reading (UR) in the UK has found that, based on tests conducted, nearly every single woman with breast cancer has one or more paraben chemicals in her breast tissue, suggesting a possible link between the chemical and the disease. According to the UK’s Daily Mail, Dr. Philippa Darbre and her team from UR gathered tissue samples from 40 women who were undergoing... (Read More ...)

Did You Know About Apples And Other Fruit? Sure, apples are delicious and healthy. And, as NaturalNews has previously reported, there is a growing body of evidence showing apples fight cancer. In fact, half a dozen studies published by Rui Hai Liu, Cornell associate professor of food science and a member of Cornell’s Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology, have found eating apples is an especially powerful way to prevent breast cancer  (http://www.naturalnews.com/025685_c…). Now there’s breaking research news that shows consuming apples regularly may contribute... (Read More ...)

According to a Study – What Vitamin D Can Do Current government recommendations of 400 or 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day are insufficient to prevent serious diseases like breast cancer, a new study published in the journal Anticancer Research has found. Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine and Creighton University (CU) School of Medicine discovered that when much higher doses of vitamin D are taken daily, the risks associated with developing several major diseases are reduced by about half. “We found that daily intakes of... (Read More ...)

Two Types of Breast Cancer – Signs and Symptoms to Look For  Breast cancer is classified into two types, based on whether or not it is invasive: * Noninvasive (in situ) breast cancer: Cancer cells have not spread to adjacent areas of your breast—they have remained in their place of origin. The most common type is ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), which occurs in the lining of the milk ducts. Noninvasive breast cancer is sometimes called “stage 0” cancer. * Invasive breast cancer. Cancer cells infiltrate or spread outside the membrane that lines a duct or lobule, into surrounding... (Read More ...)

Facts About Breast Cancer According to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, 200,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed each year in the US, making it three times more common than other gynecological cancers. Breast cancer will claim the lives of 40,000 people this year. What is really disturbing is the speed at which breast cancer rates have risen over the past 5 decades. In 1960, one in twenty women were diagnosed—but today, it is one in seven. The following are some important facts about this type of cancer: * One woman in eight who lives to age 85 will develop breast cancer. *... (Read More ...)

The Experts Speak on Mammograms and Breast Cancer – Part 4 This is the final part of the article from http://www.naturalnews.com Below is a good resource of information written by a variety of doctors.   Regular mammography of younger women increases their cancer risks. Analysis of controlled trials over the last decade has shown consistent increases in breast cancer mortality within a few years of commencing screening. This confirms evidence of the high sensitivity of the premenopausal breast, and on cumulative carcinogenic effects of radiation. The Politics Of Cancer by Samuel S Epstein... (Read More ...)

Mammograms and Breast Cancer – Part 3 New Screening Technologies While screening is an important step in fighting breast cancer, many researchers are looking for alternatives to mammography. Burton Goldberg totes the safety and accuracy of new thermography technologies. Able to detect cancers at a minute physical stage of development, thermography does not use x-rays, nor is there any compression of the breast. Also important, new thermography technologies do not lose effectiveness with dense breast tissue, decreasing the chances of false-negative results. Some doctors are now offering digital... (Read More ...)

Mammograms and Breast Cancer – Part 2 Radiation Risks Many critics of mammography cite the hazardous health effects of radiation. In 1976, the controversy over radiation and mammography reached a saturation point. At that time mammographic technology delivered five to 10 rads (radiation-absorbed doses) per screening, as compared to 1 rad in current screening methods. In women between the ages of 35 and 50, each rad of exposure increased the risk of breast cancer by one percent, according to Dr. Frank Rauscher, then-director of the NCI. According to Russell L. Blaylock, MD, one estimate is... (Read More ...)

Mammograms and Breast Cancer – Part 1 Breast cancer is the leading cause of death among American women between the ages of 44 and 55. Dr. Gofinan, in his book, Preventing Breast Cancer, cites this startling statistic along with an in-depth look at mammographic screening, an early-detection practice that agencies like the American Cancer Society recommend to women of all age groups. According to most health experts, catching a tumor in its early stages increases a woman’s chances of survival by at least 17 percent. The most common method for early detection is mammography. A mammogram... (Read More ...)

Women on Menopause Therapy More Likely to Develop Advanced Cancer, Die, Study Says Women undergoing hormone therapy for the symptoms of menopause face an increased risk of developing invasive breast cancer or dying of the disease, according to the results of an 11-year study. Women taking a hormone therapy that uses a combination of estrogen and progestin were 1.25 times more likely to develop invasive breast cancer, and two times more likely to die from breast cancer, than women who took a placebo over the study period. The study is a follow-up of participants in the Women’s Health Initiative,... (Read More ...)