Menopause Hot Flashes: Causes and Relief

Understanding And Dealing With Menopause Hot Flashes

The majority of women suffer from hot flashes before, during, and after menopause. These are sudden feelings warmth that can cause redness of skin and sweating. They also affect your sleep quality.

Menopause hot flashes are mainly the result of hormonal changes and some of the symptoms can be simply managed by drinking more water and using a fan. Hormone therapy is another thing that helps a lot of women, even though it isn’t suitable for everyone. However, the best treatment depends directly from your symptoms and their harshness.

Duration of Hot Flashes in Menopause

Although hot flashes menopause are completely normal, you can find them quite disturbing. Some ladies experience hot flashes once a day, while others have them for most part of the day, with episodes coming throughout the day and night.

Typically, night sweats last for no longer than four minutes. Episodes can happen whenever, and might get worse if you have a fever or when you are stressed out.

How Long Do Hot Flashes Last After Menopause

There is no right answer to this question, because it depends from woman to woman. There are also women who never even have hot flashes (about 20% of these). However, most women experience them for about 7 years, and there are also those who have hot flashes for over ten years.

Women start having menopause hot flashes in pre-menopause years, and they usually stop soon enough once menopause occurs. However, women also deal with hot flashes after menopause is over.

What Causes Hot Flashes In Menopause

It’s not a secret that hot flashes may be triggered by a number of things, including stress, spicy food, smoking, caffeine, and so on. However, the number one reason is still hormone changes that you experience during menopause. And even though there are plenty of factors that can make hot flashes a lot more probable, they may appear even in the absence of triggers.

Ovaries produce numerous types of estrogen, and in the years leading to menopause, our body starts producing a lot less of estrogen hormones. The decrease in estrogen happens step by step and at irregular intervals before and after menopause, making hot flashes after menopause a possibility.

What Can Cause Hot Flashes Other Than Menopause

There are a lot of possible causes. In fact, hot flashes can be a sign of a serious underlying medical condition. They can also signify an abnormal allergy or reaction growth, or be a side effect of prescribed medication.

Here is the list of the possible causes:

  • Stress followed by an adrenaline rush may create a feeling of warmth that feels a hot flash, so if you live a life full of pressure, this reaction can be triggered.
  • Thyroid problems like hyperthyroidism, which causes thyroid hormone overabundance, may increase the body’s metabolism and cause hot flashes no menopause.
  • Drugs can also cause hot flashes for as long as you take them, and if that’s the case, it might be wise to consult your doctor and change your medication.
  • Hormone-secreting tumors like pancreatic tumors bypass the ability of the organs to help the body function properly and may result in hot flashes.
  • Food and drink are another reason for hot flashes. It might happen right after a meal or a couple of drinks, but eating less and reducing or avoiding caffeine and alcohol can fix the problem.

Menopause And Hot Flashes Relief

Taking estrogen is the most effective way to alleviate the discomfort of hot flashes, but it can also be risky. However, if estrogen is suitable for you and you start taking it before the age 60, it can be totally worth it.

Antidepressants can also be effective when dealing with hot flashes, but are less effective than hormones.

Finally, there are natural remedies for menopause hot flashes, but you should first discuss all of the advantages and disadvantages of each treatment with your doctor.

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